Lists: errata lists

ref corrigenda list errata err corrigendum

Encoding of errata lists with div type="errata" and a nested list type="errata". Within each list item, further encoding captures the functional components such as the error, the page number, etc.

The TEI does not make any specific provision for errata lists. The following provisions are made using basic TEI elements and features.

Errata lists should be encoded where they appear in the text, enclosed within a div type="errata". Within this div, the list itself should be encoded as list type="errata", with each separate error encoded as an individual item element. If the errata are not presented as a list, then they may be encoded within a p element. The enclosing div type="errata" will allow the errata to be identified as such for processing purposes.

Since the errata list provides useful information concerning how the text should be corrected, it’s a good idea to capture that information explicitly so that it can be used: for instance, to generate a corrected version of the text. When producing output, you may wish to incorporate these corrections along with your own (e.g. correction of typographical errors using sic), or you may choose to keep them separate (or distinguish between the two using color-coding).

For each erratum, the correction itself should be encoded using ref type="correction". The error itself (where it appears in the main body of the text) should be encoded using ref type="error". The target attribute of each element will point to the id of its corresponding element, so that the error and the correction each point to each other. This allows a substitution to be made automatically. In some errata lists, a single correction points to several errors; in this case, the target attribute would contain multiple values, separated by a space.

Although errata lists typically identify the page number on which an error occurs, this information need not be encoded as a link, since the ref carries the essential information. Encoding the page number as well would be redundant.

It may be useful to identify errata as authorial or not, if that information is available. This encoding would allow you to present the text as printed, with only authorial corrections, or with any available corrections. The distinction would be particularly valuable if many corrections have been made. You can use the resp attribute on ref to encode either the name (or name key) of a particular person, or simply an indication such as author or editor.

Examples

Example 1.

<speech sp="DGale.ned">Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in 
<ref type="error" target="ec45"  id="er45">Kentucky</ref> anymore. 
</speech>
...
<div type="corrigenda">
<head>Errata</head>
<list type="errata">
<item>...
<item> On Page 12, line 34, “we’re not in Kentucky anymore” should read "we’re not in  
<ref type="correction"  target="er45" id="ec45">Kansas</ref> 
anymore"
</item>...
</list>
</div>

Example 2. A more formalized representation of the original error’s location, using ref

Note that this <gi>ref</gi> doesn’t need to point anywhere, since the
<gi>ref</gi> that encodes the correction is already pointing directly
to the error location:

<div type="corrigenda">
  <head>Errata</head>
  <list type="errata">
    <mw type="listHead">Page</mw>
    <mw type="listHead" rend="break(no)">Page</mw>
    <item>...
    <item><ref>12, 34</ref>, “we’re not in Kentucky anymore” should read "we’re not in  
    <ref type="correction"  target="er45" id="ec45">Kansas</ref> 
       anymore"
</item>...
</list>
</div>